Client Relations

This is FindLaw's Law Firm Management Center's collection of free articles on Client Relations. Managing the client relationship is a core issue and challenge facing all law firms. Clients are key to the sustainability of your law practice. Issues like client intake, communication, case updates, customer surveys, and holiday gifts are all parts of Client Relations. Are you catering to one of your most important business assets? Could you service your clients better? Start your research with FindLaw.
Client Relations Articles
    • Organizing Your Personal Injury Cases - A Step by Step Checklist
      Provided by Anne C. O'Donnell of FindLaw
      Here are 16 steps to help you streamline the organization of your personal injury case.

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    • Hit the Ground Running in Counseling New Clients
      Provided by Alan S. Gutterman of Gutterman Law & Business
      When counseling the "new client" you will need to obtain as much information as possible about the business and operations of the client so that you will be able to start making a contribution as quickly as possible.

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    • Create Your Own Executive Summary of the Activities of Your New Clients
      Provided by Alan S. Gutterman of Gutterman Law & Business
      As you go through your client's documents, you should develop your own "executive summary" that includes the information that will be most essential to your activities and which you will need to know as you communicate with executives, managers and outside business partners.

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    • 5 Tips for Small Law Firms to Deal with Negative Online Reviews
      Provided by InternetReputationManagement.com
      Expert tips on how to navigate the new, increasingly convoluted world of online reputation management.

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    • Customer Service
      Provided by U.S. Small Business Administration
      The Golden Rule, "do unto others as you would have them do unto you," may seem self-evident in the way we try to conduct our personal lives. Yet this axiom is assuming new importance as a guiding principle in the world of business.

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    • How to Handle Difficult Clients
      Provided by Steven A. Meyerowitz of The Pennsylvania Lawyer
      A lawyer who has been practicing for any length of time at all no doubt has encountered the "difficult" client. This is not necessarily the client who simply presents a difficult case with complex legal issues, the client who stops paying a lawyer's bills as it nears bankruptcy or even the client who involves the lawyer in conflict of interest or ethics problems. The difficult client is difficult in a human-relations sense.

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    • Ten Things to Consider About Potential Clients
      Provided by Editorial Staff of FindLaw
      A potential client walks in your front door, or sends you an email from your Web site. How did that client find you? How did that client choose your firm from dozens of other competitors that could offer him similar services? Whether you are designing a Web site, developing a brochure, or even considering the layout of your lobby, everything you do affects the way a potential client thinks of your firm.

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    • Planning Your Law Firm Holiday Client Gifts
      Provided by Editorial Staff of FindLaw
      While every firm is different, here are ten tips for marketing during the holiday season.

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    • 6 Things That Drive Clients Crazy and How to Avoid Them
      Provided by Edward Poll of Edward Poll
      Clients call lawyers when they have a problem. Business questions, a death in the family, a divorce, an accident, a bankruptcy -- all are potential stress producers, and the last thing clients want is more stress or irritation because of their dealings with their attorneys. Lawyers need to find ways to eliminate the unnecessary irritants that really send clients up a wall.

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    • Don't Leave Your Client Relationship on the Sidelines
      Provided by Edward Poll of Edward Poll
      Many lawyers leave their clients on the sidelines, on the outside looking in. It may be time for attorneys to replace this strategy with one that educates their clients and encourages them to join the legal problem-solving team.

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