Startup

This is FindLaw's Law Firm Management Center's collection of free articles on Startup. Startup refers to the very early stages of running a solo or small law practice. There are many business details to consider in the early stages of starting and running your law practice. Start your research with FindLaw.
Startup Articles
    • IP, Copyrights, Patents, and Trademarks FAQs
      Provided by U.S. Small Business Administration

      This article provides common answers to common intellectualy property questions regarding copyright issues.

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    • What is a Small Business?
      Provided by U.S. Small Business Administration
      The Small Business Act states that a small business concern is "one that is independently owned and operated and which is not dominant in its field of operation." The law also states that in determining what constitutes a small business, the definition will vary from industry to industry to reflect industry differences accurately.

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    • Starting a Law Firm - Finding Your Niche
      Provided by Nicholas Wells of Wells IP Law
      A key decision when launching a new firm is deciding "what you are." The days of the general practice lawyer are gone. Your chances for success are much greater if you limit yourself to a particular area of law where you can become an expert.

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    • Federal and State Business Licensing Requirements
      Provided by Editorial Staff of FindLaw
      Lawyers looking to start a firm should look into any federal or state license or permit requirements which may be applicable to them.

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    • Using the Business Plan
      Provided by U.S. Small Business Administration
      A business plan is a tool with three basic purposes: communication, management, and planning.

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    • How to Make a Good Decision
      Provided by U.S. Small Business Administration
      Decisions, decisions, decisions. It seems like every time we turn around, we have to make more decisions. The question is, "Are you a good decision maker?" If you aren't (or don't think you are), there is no need to worry. Decision-making is a skill that can be learned by anyone.

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    • Competitive Analysis
      Provided by U.S. Small Business Administration
      Business takes place in a highly competitive, volatile environment, so it is important to understand the competition. Answering these questions like these can help.

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    • Forecasting Growth Through Strategic Thinking
      Provided by U.S. Small Business Administration
      Maintaining your momentum means looking forward even as you focus on the present. Forecasting and planning are critical to your continued success.

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    • Do I Really Need a Lawyer?
      Provided by U.S. Small Business Administration
      This is the first question you should ask yourself. In some cases, you can handle the problem without hiring a lawyer. If the problem is small and can be handled without the advice of a lawyer, then you can usually find the right forms and resources to help you at a Legal Portal like FindLaw.com. However, if the situation involves a major problem like being slapped with a lawsuit or charged with a crime, you probably need a lawyer.

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    • Product Basics
      Provided by U.S. Small Business Administration
      Products may be described in terms of their features and benefits. Features are product characteristics; benefits are customer needs served by those features. Some examples of features are size, color, horsepower, functionality, design, hours of business, and fabric content. Benefits are less tangible but always answer the customer's question: What's in it for me?

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